eduMedia Watch – don’t believe the hype

Apologies for thieving this image from Delimiter without permission - I'll take it down if its a problem.
Jonathan Holmes not believing the hype

I have a confession to make. I used to be a Media Watch junkie. Back in the day of Jonathan Holmes, I’d subscribe to the Media Watch podcast and it would be my staple viewing on work flights, enjoying Holmes’ dry wit and the work of the Media Watch team as they critiqued some of the more questionable cases of media coverage in Australia. One of my particular favourites was when they would pick up on media airtime that had started with ‘a new report’ being released that had been used as a basis for many more follow up stories, but with one problem – the original ‘report’ was either unverified in terms of its independence, or it was just completely bunk.

This week, I’ve been playing eduMedia Watch.

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Edtech – look how far we’ve come…

cc licensed - thanks http://www.flickr.com/photos/oskay/9370932025/Nostalgia time.

Wind your mind back 21 years ago to 1992. The Cold War officially ended, Shane Warne took his first Test wicket, Miley Cyrus was born, and Nirvana’s ‘Nevermind’ knocked off Michael Jackson’s ‘Dangerous’ on top of the Billboard 200. Video discs were also gaining popularity, even though it would take another three years for an agreed standard to emerge.

Remember video discs? No – neither do I.That year I was an undergrad at Adelaide Uni, living in a share house and in my second year of a maths degree. Oh, and I had hair – sigh…

Allan Christie (my boss, founding father of NetSpot and former academic at UniSA) was however already forging ahead in 1992 into the brave new world of technology in education. He came across the document below discussing the new and exciting world of using video disc technology to support learning in the School of Nursing, and after a quick flick through I had to make a quick post to share it with the world.

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Linearity and learning

When I was a teenager, my stepdad taught me how to hit a golf ball. He was a humanities teacher for most of his career (and a bloody good one – speaking as one of his former students), and a single-figure handicap golfer (and still is). Being the impatient teen I was, I’d get frustrated with my perceived lack of progress as he taught me the techniques (physical and mental) that I needed to master if I wanted to get better. I’d feel like I was working as hard as I could, but that I wasn’t getting better. Then, every now and then, I’d ‘spike’, and my skill (or at least the measure of my skill, namely my scores around a course), would move to the ‘next level’ – dropping a few handicap strokes in a short time before plateauing again.

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